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Vaccine Hesitancy

The big thing to worry about in 2021?

I watched a documentary about vaccines the other day that talked about how dangerous ‘vaccine hesitancy’ is. They mentioned for any covid vaccine campaign to work, at least 70% of a countries population need to take it.

From all accounts there will be huge protests in the western world where people will refuse to take it. Those people range from one with mild concerns to those who (genuinely) think it is designed to alter the human DNA and has the mark of the beast in it and you won’t be able to enter heaven as God won’t allow the devil in. 🧐

So, while I think the answer should and will be ‘yes’, my questions are

1) Should the vaccine be compulsory?
2) Will the assumed huge number of people who will refuse to take it derail any attempts to get back to normality next year?

posted 2 weeks, 1 day ago

comment by Red Russian (U4715)
posted 1 hour, 55 minutes ago
Pretty much everything that needs to be said has been already in this thread so my comments are basically seconding other people's views.

1) The anti-vaccination arguments tend to share a characteristic with the anti-mask arguments, which is "it's my choice whether I want to risk getting Covid" and therefore failing to focus on the dimension of doing something for the common good. I'm pretty confident that my health and age would put me in good stead to survive Covid-19. I don't enjoy wearing a mask and having my glasses steam up. But these are things we do to protect other people, to minimise the spread and the prevalence of the disease in our community. It has been argued that the vulnerable will be vaccinated first - but not everyone in the vulnerable category will be. There will be vulnerable people who are taken in by anti-vax misinformation. There will be people with pre-existing conditions that haven't been diagnosed. And what, as someone else mentioned, if Covid-19, left endemic in our population, undergoes a mutation that makes it deadlier and harder to stop? There isn't a scenario where it isn't in our common good to get as close to eradication of the disease.

2) Some people have talked about the unknown 'long-term risks' of the vaccine. First of all, medical scientists are inventing the wheel. They are using vaccine technologies that have already been developed. It's my understanding that we know a lot more about their effects on our bodies than the vaccine-wary believe. It has also been noted in the coverage that one of the reasons the vaccines are so effective is that the structure of the Covid-19 cells make them particularly easy to 'attack' once our immune system is taught how to. But secondly, we also don't know much about the long-term effects of Covid. We're starting to discover that it effects the cardiological system and the brain as well as the respiratory system. We're starting to learn about 'Long Covid'. And there have been cases of young, fit people who were asymptomatic when they had Covid developing alarming symptoms such as blood clots some time later. Even if you're approaching this purely on a self-interested basis, I don't think taking the chance of catching Covid-19 is a risk-free approach.

3) I don't believe in forcing needles into people's arms against their will. But we do, or should, live in a society where our rights are balanced by responsibilities. Once a properly tested and certified vaccine is universally available, I'm in favour of protecting the public by restricting access to certain social spaces to those who have been vaccinated. This shouldn't be done in a punitive way, and the extent and duration of the policy should be led by the epidemiological evidence.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the sort of triggered, unreasoned response I've come to expect from RR

posted 2 weeks, 1 day ago

comment by merrysupersteve (monitoring the situation) (U1132)
posted 43 minutes ago
comment by Red Russian (U4715)
posted 1 hour, 55 minutes ago
Pretty much everything that needs to be said has been already in this thread so my comments are basically seconding other people's views.

1) The anti-vaccination arguments tend to share a characteristic with the anti-mask arguments, which is "it's my choice whether I want to risk getting Covid" and therefore failing to focus on the dimension of doing something for the common good. I'm pretty confident that my health and age would put me in good stead to survive Covid-19. I don't enjoy wearing a mask and having my glasses steam up. But these are things we do to protect other people, to minimise the spread and the prevalence of the disease in our community. It has been argued that the vulnerable will be vaccinated first - but not everyone in the vulnerable category will be. There will be vulnerable people who are taken in by anti-vax misinformation. There will be people with pre-existing conditions that haven't been diagnosed. And what, as someone else mentioned, if Covid-19, left endemic in our population, undergoes a mutation that makes it deadlier and harder to stop? There isn't a scenario where it isn't in our common good to get as close to eradication of the disease.

2) Some people have talked about the unknown 'long-term risks' of the vaccine. First of all, medical scientists are inventing the wheel. They are using vaccine technologies that have already been developed. It's my understanding that we know a lot more about their effects on our bodies than the vaccine-wary believe. It has also been noted in the coverage that one of the reasons the vaccines are so effective is that the structure of the Covid-19 cells make them particularly easy to 'attack' once our immune system is taught how to. But secondly, we also don't know much about the long-term effects of Covid. We're starting to discover that it effects the cardiological system and the brain as well as the respiratory system. We're starting to learn about 'Long Covid'. And there have been cases of young, fit people who were asymptomatic when they had Covid developing alarming symptoms such as blood clots some time later. Even if you're approaching this purely on a self-interested basis, I don't think taking the chance of catching Covid-19 is a risk-free approach.

3) I don't believe in forcing needles into people's arms against their will. But we do, or should, live in a society where our rights are balanced by responsibilities. Once a properly tested and certified vaccine is universally available, I'm in favour of protecting the public by restricting access to certain social spaces to those who have been vaccinated. This shouldn't be done in a punitive way, and the extent and duration of the policy should be led by the epidemiological evidence.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the sort of triggered, unreasoned response I've come to expect from RR
----------------------------------------------------------------------
IKR someone really should just report this guy already

posted 2 weeks, 1 day ago

comment by Sat Nav (U18243)
posted 4 hours, 43 minutes ago
*aren't inventing the wheel
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Thank you!

posted 2 weeks, 1 day ago

This is the sort of triggered, unreasoned response I've come to expect from RR
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Bed-wetter!

posted 2 weeks, 1 day ago

comment by Red Russian (U4715)
posted 32 minutes ago
This is the sort of triggered, unreasoned response I've come to expect from RR
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Bed-wetter!
----------------------------------------------------------------------
🤣

posted 2 weeks, 1 day ago

comment by merrysupersteve (monitoring the situation) (U1132)
posted 3 hours, 41 minutes ago
comment by Red Russian (U4715)
posted 1 hour, 55 minutes ago
Pretty much everything that needs to be said has been already in this thread so my comments are basically seconding other people's views.

1) The anti-vaccination arguments tend to share a characteristic with the anti-mask arguments, which is "it's my choice whether I want to risk getting Covid" and therefore failing to focus on the dimension of doing something for the common good. I'm pretty confident that my health and age would put me in good stead to survive Covid-19. I don't enjoy wearing a mask and having my glasses steam up. But these are things we do to protect other people, to minimise the spread and the prevalence of the disease in our community. It has been argued that the vulnerable will be vaccinated first - but not everyone in the vulnerable category will be. There will be vulnerable people who are taken in by anti-vax misinformation. There will be people with pre-existing conditions that haven't been diagnosed. And what, as someone else mentioned, if Covid-19, left endemic in our population, undergoes a mutation that makes it deadlier and harder to stop? There isn't a scenario where it isn't in our common good to get as close to eradication of the disease.

2) Some people have talked about the unknown 'long-term risks' of the vaccine. First of all, medical scientists are inventing the wheel. They are using vaccine technologies that have already been developed. It's my understanding that we know a lot more about their effects on our bodies than the vaccine-wary believe. It has also been noted in the coverage that one of the reasons the vaccines are so effective is that the structure of the Covid-19 cells make them particularly easy to 'attack' once our immune system is taught how to. But secondly, we also don't know much about the long-term effects of Covid. We're starting to discover that it effects the cardiological system and the brain as well as the respiratory system. We're starting to learn about 'Long Covid'. And there have been cases of young, fit people who were asymptomatic when they had Covid developing alarming symptoms such as blood clots some time later. Even if you're approaching this purely on a self-interested basis, I don't think taking the chance of catching Covid-19 is a risk-free approach.

3) I don't believe in forcing needles into people's arms against their will. But we do, or should, live in a society where our rights are balanced by responsibilities. Once a properly tested and certified vaccine is universally available, I'm in favour of protecting the public by restricting access to certain social spaces to those who have been vaccinated. This shouldn't be done in a punitive way, and the extent and duration of the policy should be led by the epidemiological evidence.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the sort of triggered, unreasoned response I've come to expect from RR
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Even though I didn’t know RR wore glasses I feel that I’ve always known..

posted 2 weeks, 1 day ago

comment by merrysupersteve (monitoring the situation) (U1132)
posted 10 hours, 7 minutes ago
comment by Dr Sheldon Cooper (U1217)
posted 1 second ago
comment by Edinspur (U1109)
posted 6 minutes ago
Why has this 70% number been used? Genuinely interested.

People always talk about the side effects of vaccines - but are they really that bad? I’ve never really heard of any genuine long term side - effects but appreciate that I don’t really research it at all. Did listen to a podcast on the ‘Autism’ conspiracy and all the research papers link to a source that is misquoted as it says it’s actually fine
----------------------------------------------------------------------
I remember reading an article a few weeks ago which basically said long term negative effects of a vaccine isn't really a thing. If I manage to find it again I'll put the link on here.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
That was always my understanding. That any negative impacts would be pretty immediate. Though as someone posted above, in terms of pregnancy etc the impact may not be immediately clear. So I can understand any fear in that regard
----------------------------------------------------------------------
I think this was the article I was referring to

https://edwardnirenberg.medium.com/long-term-effects-of-covid-19-vaccines-should-you-be-worried-c3c3a547b565

posted 2 weeks, 1 day ago

comment by Robb Pochettino - 🧢 Make United Great Again (U22311)
posted 2 hours, 15 minutes ago
comment by merrysupersteve (monitoring the situation) (U1132)
posted 3 hours, 41 minutes ago
comment by Red Russian (U4715)
posted 1 hour, 55 minutes ago
Pretty much everything that needs to be said has been already in this thread so my comments are basically seconding other people's views.

1) The anti-vaccination arguments tend to share a characteristic with the anti-mask arguments, which is "it's my choice whether I want to risk getting Covid" and therefore failing to focus on the dimension of doing something for the common good. I'm pretty confident that my health and age would put me in good stead to survive Covid-19. I don't enjoy wearing a mask and having my glasses steam up. But these are things we do to protect other people, to minimise the spread and the prevalence of the disease in our community. It has been argued that the vulnerable will be vaccinated first - but not everyone in the vulnerable category will be. There will be vulnerable people who are taken in by anti-vax misinformation. There will be people with pre-existing conditions that haven't been diagnosed. And what, as someone else mentioned, if Covid-19, left endemic in our population, undergoes a mutation that makes it deadlier and harder to stop? There isn't a scenario where it isn't in our common good to get as close to eradication of the disease.

2) Some people have talked about the unknown 'long-term risks' of the vaccine. First of all, medical scientists are inventing the wheel. They are using vaccine technologies that have already been developed. It's my understanding that we know a lot more about their effects on our bodies than the vaccine-wary believe. It has also been noted in the coverage that one of the reasons the vaccines are so effective is that the structure of the Covid-19 cells make them particularly easy to 'attack' once our immune system is taught how to. But secondly, we also don't know much about the long-term effects of Covid. We're starting to discover that it effects the cardiological system and the brain as well as the respiratory system. We're starting to learn about 'Long Covid'. And there have been cases of young, fit people who were asymptomatic when they had Covid developing alarming symptoms such as blood clots some time later. Even if you're approaching this purely on a self-interested basis, I don't think taking the chance of catching Covid-19 is a risk-free approach.

3) I don't believe in forcing needles into people's arms against their will. But we do, or should, live in a society where our rights are balanced by responsibilities. Once a properly tested and certified vaccine is universally available, I'm in favour of protecting the public by restricting access to certain social spaces to those who have been vaccinated. This shouldn't be done in a punitive way, and the extent and duration of the policy should be led by the epidemiological evidence.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the sort of triggered, unreasoned response I've come to expect from RR
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Even though I didn’t know RR wore glasses I feel that I’ve always known..
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Contacts on Wednesday evenings when I play football.

posted 2 weeks, 1 day ago

Are there any long term side effects of known vaccines? I feel as though people are confusing them with drugs

posted 2 weeks ago

comment by Wonder Man (U11164)
posted 8 hours, 48 minutes ago
Are there any long term side effects of known vaccines? I feel as though people are confusing them with drugs
----------------------------------------------------------------------
If you read the article posted by Dr Sheldon Cooper (U1217) above, you'll see that there's really no such thing.

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